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Our Member Organisations

The National Foundation for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing has ten member organisations, each with a different focus. All are committed to promoting good hearing and helping those with hearing loss.

The member organisations determine the Foundation’s focus and purpose. They share ideas, manage joint projects and contribute to publications about hearing issues. The Foundation's ten member organisations are:

HEARING RESEARCH FOUNDATION

 

Our mission: To provide funding for research into hearing disorders that will ultimately transform clinical otology practice and lead to positive outcomes for the hearing impaired.

 

We achieve our mission by:

 

• The provision of cornerstone funding for the Eisdell Moore Research Centre

• Supporting high quality, world leading research in hearing loss and its clinical management

• Supporting the career development of emerging scientists

• Supporting research opportunities for clinicians

• Raising public awareness of hearing disorders and promoting the need to support research

 

Hearing Research Foundation

PO Box 17-220, Greenlane, Auckland 1546

 

Email: info@hrf.nz

DEAF CHILDREN NZ

The New Zealand Federation for Deaf Children is an incorporated society made up of regional member groups. Our vision is of a future without barriers for every deaf child.

 

What we do

In New Zealand, around 170 deaf babies are born every year, mostly to parents with little experience of deafness. We provide support, information and networking opportunities for these parents, as well as help for the children. Our services include:

 

  • Family information kits

  • Assistive equipment subsidy

  • Tutor fee assistance

  • Scholarships for tertiary students

  • Freephone helpline providing information about many issues related to childhood deafness

Advocacy on behalf of deaf children and their parents

 

If you’d like to talk to another parent or learn more about childhood deafness, please contact us.

HEARING NEW ZEALAND

Hearing New Zealand (also known as The Hearing Association New Zealand) exists to help people with any type of hearing problem. We are a volunteer organisation and receive no government funding. We began as the League for the Hard of Hearing in 1932. 

 

We changed our name to The Hearing Association in 1976. We have 23 local associations spread throughout New Zealand. Each local association is a separate incorporated society, with members selecting the officers. This enables us to operate at low cost.

 

What we do

Local associations offer one-to-one support for local people with hearing problems, members and non-members alike, both socially and in the workplace. Some of our Member Associations offer free hearing tests in conjunction with LIFE Unlimited. A number of LIFE’s trained hearing therapists work from our branch premises.

 

The Hearing Association does not fit hearing aids, as this needs to be done by qualified professionals. But we do provide a full range of other assistive devices. We also run public education about preventing hearing loss.

 

The Hearing Association does not fit hearing aids, as this needs to be done by qualified professionals. But we do provide a full range of other assistive devices.

 

We also run public education about preventing hearing loss.

PINDROP FOUNDATION

 

When someone lives in a world of silence, they live with the hope that somehow they will be given the key to unlock the door to a hearing world.

 

The Pindrop Foundation was established in 2006 to keep that hope alive through supporting access to cochlear implant information and services.

 

Our values are commitment and passion for bringing the gift of sound to those with hearing loss.

 

Visit Pindrop's website to find out more below.

NZSOHNS

 

Otolaryngology, Head and Neck (ORL) Surgery is a surgical specialty, also known as ear, nose and throat surgery (ENT). Our members are doctors who work in this specialty as consultants, hospital doctors and trainees. We also have members who are experts in a related science.

 

Our members deal with conditions affecting the ears, nose, throat, head and neck. Some examples include:

 

  • Hearing loss and ear infections

  • Nose injuries and nasal allergies

  • Throat inflammations, snoring problems and tonsillitis

  • Neck swellings, thyroid and salivary gland disorders

  • The society exists to help members share information and increase knowledge in this specialist area. 

 

Learn more on the NZSOHNS website and find membership forms if you wish to join. 

NEW ZEALAND AUDIOLOGICAL SOCIETY

 

Our objective is to ensure a high standard of hearing healthcare for children and adults with hearing loss. We are here to help you hear! Our members use the letters MNZAS to show that they’re a member of the New Zealand Audiological Society. 

 

Why you should see an NZAS audiologist

Our members all have a university qualification in audiology and a current practising certificate. They are bound by a strict code of ethics and must fulfill continuing education requirements. Members also have to have their work reviewed by their colleagues every two years to keep their membership.

 

Find an MNZAS Audiologist

To contact a private audiology clinic directly, visit the New Zealand Audiological Society website.

 

To see a hospital audiologist, you usually need a referral from your doctor or ear specialist.

THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND

Our objective is to promote the science and practice of acoustics. Our members are especially interested in problems associated with noise and noise control.

 

Membership

We are an incorporated society with branches in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch. Our membership is open to anyone with an interest in acoustics.

 

What we do

We hold regular branch meetings, seminars and a two-yearly conference. Our society journal, New Zealand Acoustics, is published quarterly, and is free for society members. The journal always includes an original research paper, as well as local news, information about people, products and events.

 

Rating noisy restaurants

Many people have trouble conversing in trendy cafés and restaurants. That’s because noise levels are increasing. Design elements, coffee machines, music and clattering dishes all contribute to the din.

 

So we’ve developed a Café and Restaurant Acoustic Index (CRAI). Use our CRAI Rating Form to comment on noise levels at any café or restaurant you’ve visited by visiting our website below.

HEARING THERAPISTS ASSOCIATION OF NEW ZEALAND

 

Hearing therapists assist people to manage the impact of hearing loss. Hearing Therapists Association of New Zealand (Inc) (HTANZ) is the professional organisation through which hearing therapists can be represented and the profession of hearing therapy be developed.

 

Why you should see a HTANZ Hearing Therapist

 

It's never too early – or too late – to see a hearing therapist. You will be provided with free, independent, confidential advice and support. 

 

Hearing therapists who are Accredited Assessors for Hearing Assistive Technology, funded by the Ministry of Health, or who work with ACC clients, are required to be members of HTANZ. They must work within the HTANZ Scope of Practice, are bound by a Code of Ethics and must fulfil continuing education requirements.

 

The Ministry of Health currently funds a FREE Aural Rehabilitation Service (Hearing Therapy) for anyone 16 years and over, who is a New Zealand citizen or permanent resident. LIFE Unlimited currently holds the contract for this service and employs hearing therapists throughout New Zealand. People may refer themselves or may be referred by other services, including their doctor, audiologist or Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist.

 

Hearing therapists will provide a comprehensive report of their findings or onward referral to a health service in consultation with the person.

Find an HTANZ hearing therapist by visiting our website below.

SOUTHERN COCHLEAR IMPLANT PROGRAMME

 

The Southern Hearing Charitable Trust’s Southern Cochlear Implant Programme (SCIP) is publicly funded and serves profoundly deaf children and adults in the Lower North and South Islands of New Zealand.

 

A cochlear implant can help children and adults with moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss who derive minimal benefit from conventional hearing aids.

 

Since 2003, the SCIP team has helped children and adults to reconnect to the world of sound.

 

View the SCIP website below.

HEAR FOR FAMILIES

 

Hear for Families is a nationwide organisation for people living with Auditory Processing Disorder, both adults and children.  H4F provides support, education, and advocacy for people with Auditory Processing Disorder and their families.  We are registered charity run by people living with APD and parents of children with APD.

 

View the Hear for Familes website below.

Address: Level 1, 149-155 Parnell Road,

Parnell, Auckland, 1152

PO Box 37729 Parnell, Auckland 1151, New Zealand

Phone: 09 307 2922 or 0800 867 446 

Email: enquiries@nfd.org.nz

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© 2020 The National Foundation for the Deaf Inc.